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Medicine 

During his time of earth, Jesus demonstrated compassion and his power as the Son of God by healing people of many sicknesses and diseases. The gospel of Luke is believed to have been written by a doctor (Colossians 4:14).
 
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Statue of Asklepios

 

Date: 160 AD copy of 4th century BC statue

Place: Sanctuary of Askleopios at Epidauros, Greece

 

Photographed at the National Archeological Museum of Athens, Athens, Greece

 

Throughout the Bible, there is a close link between health and righteousness.

 

“If you listen carefully to the Lord your God and do what is right in his eyes, if you pay attention to his commands and keep all his decrees, I will not bring on you any of the diseases I brought on the Egyptians, for I am the Lord, who heals you.” (Exodus 15:26)

 

 

Relief of Heroised Physician

 

Date: 50 BC – 50 AD.

Place: Unknown

 

Photographed at the Altes Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

On hearing this, Jesus said, “It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. But go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’ For I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners.” (Matthew 9:12)

 

Statue of Asklepios

 

Date: 2nd century AD.

Place:  Roman – origin unknown

 

Photographed at the Altes Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

While many people looked to false god’s like Asklepios for healing, God indicates that he is the one who can heal.

 

Heal me, Lord, and I will be healed; save me and I will be saved, for you are the one I praise. (Jeremiah 17:14)

 

 

Medicine Casket

 

Date: 3rd century AD.

Place: Xanten, Germany

 

Photographed at the Neues Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

Bronze Medicine Box

 

Date: 1st – 3rd century AD.

Place: Asia Minor [Turkey]

 

Photographed at the British Museum, London, England.

 

 

Stone Stamp for Marking Eye Ointments

 

Date: 1st – 3rd century AD.

Place: Naix, Northern France

 

Photographed at the British Museum, London, England.

 

The stamp is inscribed with four recipes. They include ‘saffron ointment for soreness’ and ‘saffron ointment for scratches and running prepared by Junius Taurus from a prescription of Pacius’.

 

The city of Laodicea was famous for its eye salve, but God exhorted the people to turn to him for healing and wholeness:

 

‘But you do not realize that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked.  I counsel you to buy from me gold refined in the fire, so you can become rich; and white clothes to wear, so you can cover your shameful nakedness; and salve to put on your eyes, so you can see.’ (Revelation 3:17-18)

Surgery Compendium – Greek

 

Date 1st c AD.

Place: Unknown

 

Photographed at the Neues Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

 

 

 

Medical Tablet

 

Date: Unknown

Place: Ur [Iraq]

 

Photographed at the British Museum, London, England.

 

 

 

 

Medical Papyrus with Compilation of Prescriptions

 

Date c. 1250 BC. 19th Dynasty

Place: Saqqara

 

Photographed at the Neues Museum, Berlin, Germany.

 

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